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Intestinal worms

The three most common types of intestinal worms that can cause problems in our pets are roundworm, hookworm, whipworm and tapeworm. These worms live in the gastrointestinal tracts of our pets, and they lay their eggs which are passed in the faeces of the host animal.

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Do you know how heartworm is transmitted?

The transfer process of heartworm begins when a mosquito bites and feeds off an infected dog or cat. This mosquito picks up the juvenile stage of the heartworm in the blood, which are then transmitted to a new host when that mosquito bites an uninfected animal. It then takes approximately 6 months for the heartworm to mature in the blood vessels in the heart, where they can then reproduce and contribute to the environmental problem.

Author: WVS Admin
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Beware! Tick season is coming!

Most people are aware of paralysis ticks and the danger they pose to our pets. The life cycle has multiple stages, including the eggs, larvae, nymphs and adult forms. When a tick attaches to their host, they inject a toxin as they feed which causes paralysis in the host. It generally takes about 4 days of attachment before clinical signs start to show- these signs include difficulty eating and drinking as their ability to swallow is affected, difficulty walking or standing, and changes to their normal breathing rate and pattern.

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Flea's- the tip of the iceberg!

Most pet owners know that fleas can irritate their pets skin, causing them to scratch, and some pets may even be allergic to flea bites. But do you know the lifecycle of fleas, and how it is important in their control?

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Tyson learns to walk again

Tyson is a 6 year old Jack Russell cross who came to the Windaroo Veterinary Surgery when his owners found he was unable to use his back legs. When Dr Laura examined Tyson, he was unable to move his hind legs at all and appeared to be completely paralysed in his back end. Dr Laura was suspicious that a cartilage disc may have slipped in his back, causing discomfort and the paralysis. X-rays were taken that showed a very subtle narrowing between two parts of his spine. After his sedation and x-rays he gradually deteriorated, becoming even more painful and uncomfortable.

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